Patient Questions & Answers

Breast Augmentation Q&A

Breast Augmentation Q&A

Breast Augmentation Q&A


Moving forward with breast augmentation is a big decision, so it’s only natural to have a long list of questions, many of which don’t seem to be answered in the usual brochures or easily found in online resources. Here, Dr. Joseph J. Castellano answers some of the most commonly heard concerns from Tampa-St. Petersburg women about those little details that matter the most.If your breast augmentation question isn’t answered below, contact us online today to schedule a consultation. Dr. Castellano is a skilled cosmetic surgeon who specializes in breast enhancement, and adopts a personalized approach to cosmetic surgery that ensures that you have a positive experience with us from consultation through recovery.


  • I’ve thought about breast implants for a long time, but I still can’t decide, How do I know if I’m making the right decision?

    Every woman is different. Some women schedule a breast implant appointment without much planning and love their results, while others research for years and still aren’t quite sure if they’re ready to commit. If you’ve done your homework, know the basic pros and cons and yet still feel hesitant, I strongly recommend scheduling a consultation to learn more about breast augmentation. You’ll get much more detailed and precise information than you could ever read about online, and walk out of the office a much better idea of what to expect. The truth is, regardless of how much research you do ahead of time, there are some questions that only your surgeon can answer.


  • I’m worried I’ll pick the wrong size implants. What’s the best way to make sure I get the results I want without going too large or too small?

    While tricks like trying on rice sizers can be helpful, the implants themselves will look much different than rice—and that’s a good thing. For this reason, I advise my patients not to get too attached to a specific implant volume or bra size as a goal for their surgery, and instead to bring in “inspiration pictures” that look similar to the look you hope for. From there, my expertise allows me to make an informed decision about the right volume, breast shape and profile that will work best for you. The process of choosing breast implants isn’t something you go through on your own. Instead, you’ll have my experienced guidance to help you make the right choice.


  • I’m very physically active. How strong are implants? Could they rupture during my exercise routine?

    Both saline and silicone implants are encased in a very strong silicone elastomer shell that would take a great deal of force to rupture. Of course, some implants develop tiny leaks over time, but the failure rate overall is less than 1%. As for the connection between physical activities and implants in general, I feel it’s important to plan implant size relative to your lifestyle as well as your frame. For example, I might suggest that an avid jogger choose a slightly smaller breast implant so she’s more comfortable on the trail or treadmill.


  • I’m not happy with the way my breasts look after having a baby, but I plan on having more children. Should I get implants now, or wait? What about breastfeeding?

    Breast implants alone shouldn’t impede your ability to breastfeed, although it’s important to remember that many women are unable to nurse even without implants. Choosing a periareolar incision placement slightly increases the risks of not being able to nurse, because it’s made so close to the milk ducts, but other incision placements can minimize the risk of nursing complications. In general, I recommend women wait until they’re done having children before proceeding with breast augmentation. The breasts undergo a lot of changes during pregnancy that could impact the results of your enhancement, and require revision surgery later on. Whenever possible, one surgery is always preferable to a surgery plus a touch-up.


  • I just had surgery, and I’m not thrilled with my results. Will my breasts always look like this?

    It’s normal to feel concerned about your results, but it’s also very normal to see significant asymmetry (including shape, size and placement) between breasts right after surgery. In those first few days and weeks of recovery—and honestly, even the first few months—the body is trying to adjust to your new breast implants. Your tissues and muscles need to relax enough that the implants can settle into their final placement, and that process just takes time. Try to be patient, and keep touching base with your surgeon to make sure your healing progress is on track.

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